Reblog: 10 of the Greatest Leadership Questions Ever Asked

by Ron Edmondson

Have you ever heard the phrase, “There are no bad questions”?

In leadership, this might be true.

I have learned in my years of leadership – I only know what I know. And, many times I don’t know much. There are often things among the people I am trying to lead which I need to know – and, for whatever reason – I won’t know unless I ask. Which means I must continually ask lots of questions.

One of the best skills a leader can develop is the art of asking the right questions – and, even better – at the right times.

Here are 10 of the greatest leadership questions ever asked:

  1. How can I help you?
  2. What is the biggest challenge you have to being successful here?
  3. Do you understand what I’ve asked you to do?
  4. What am I missing or what would you do differently if you were me?
  5. What do you see I can’t see?
  6. How can I improve as your leader?
  7. If we had authority to do anything – and money was no barrier – what would you like to see us do as a team/organization?
  8. Where do you see yourself someday and how can I assist you in getting there?
  9. What are you currently learning which can help all of us?
  10. How are you doing in your personal life and is there any way I can help you?

You can rephrase these for your context and within the relationships you have with people with whom you serve. You can certainly add your own questions. But, if you are attempting to lead people, may I suggest you start asking questions.

Find the original post here.

TED Talk: How to raise successful kids — without over-parenting

By loading kids with high expectations and micromanaging their lives at every turn, parents aren’t actually helping. At least, that’s how Julie Lythcott-Haims sees it. With passion and wry humor, the former Dean of Freshmen at Stanford makes the case for parents to stop defining their children’s success via grades and test scores. Instead, she says, they should focus on providing the oldest idea of all: unconditional love.

Reblog: Loving My Gay Parents

A great radio program from Family Life Radio.

Every family is messy. Caleb Kaltenbach’s is no exception. Caleb reflects on growing up with a mom and dad who divorced when he was 2 upon discovering they were each gay. Caleb’s mother shared a home with her partner for 22 years, and his father stayed in the closet until Caleb was in college. Caleb offers unique insight on how the gay community perceives Christians.

 

 

Nathan’s 7 Habits

This is not Nathan’s class but this is the song and the theme of the entire year in the school which Nathan attends. It’s been a great year for him overall and I am very pleased with what he has been learning.

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This is the program from Nathan’s Talent Night Show-

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Nathan is in the green shirt right of center and above.

SUMMER BREAK HERE WE COME, READY OR NOT!

Reblog: Online Resources for Biblical Exegesis

by David Murray of HeadHeartHand

Here’s a selection of articles on biblical exegesis that I’ve gathered over the years from various blogs and websites. Please feel free to suggest more and I’ll add them. For more resource lists on various subjects click here.

Diagramming

How to Quickly Diagram a Biblical Passage | LogosTalk

Phrasing: My Favorite Way to Trace an Argument ‘ Andy Naselli

Chiasms on the Brain? | For His Renown

Women Weeping Over Diagrammed Sentences – The Gospel Coalition Blog

Greek and Hebrew

Do You Break These Rules for Greek and Hebrew Study? | LogosTalk

Is It a Waste of Time for Seminary Students (and Pastors) to Learn the Biblical Languages? | Canon Fodder

How to Search the Original Languages with Logos | LogosTalk

Why It Is Beneficial to Learn Greek and Hebrew Even if You Lose It | Ad Fontes

Tools for Studying the Hebrew Bible

My Advice to Students — Van Pelt Shares Solid Languages Advice He Got and Wished He Got

Encouraging reason to learn Greek | Scripture Zealot

ESV GreekTools – Justin Taylor

Rethinking the Teaching of Hebrew

Word Studies

You Should Probably Stop Using Lexicons | LogosTalk

7 Ways to Do a BAD Word Study by Nicholas McDonald -SermonCentral.com

Word Studies: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5

Do You Make These 5 Common Word Study Mistakes? | Pastoralized

Word Studies – Christian Leadership

There is more so click here.

 

Reblog: What Ivy League students are reading that you aren’t

If you want an Ivy League education, you could fork over $200 grand or so and go to Cornell or Harvard for four years. Alternatively, you could save a ton of cash by simply reading the same books Ivy League students are assigned.

That became easier recently with the release of the Open Syllabus Explorer, an online database of books assigned in over 1 million college courses over the past decade or so.

As the group behind the project explains: There’s an “intellectual judgment embedded” in the lists of books college students are required to read. The most frequently-assigned books at the nation’s universities are essentially our canon: the body of literature that society’s leaders are expected to be familiar with. So what does that canon look like?

For starters, the Explorer lets us filter by individual schools. I tallied the most frequently assigned books at all U.S. colleges and universities and compared them to the list at seven Ivy League schools — Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Cornell, Columbia, U. Penn and Brown (Dartmouth doesn’t seem to appear in the Explorer’s database — more on that below).

read the rest here.

Reblog: 11 Ways to Write Better

by The Minimalist

We are all writers now. Whether you write books, blogposts, emails, tweets, or text messages, you are a writer. No matter your preferred medium, here are a few tips to help you write more effectively:

Treat text messages like prose. Before hitting the send button, look over your text: check spelling, content, punctuation. Ask yourself: What am I attempting to communicate? What am I attempting to express? Be more deliberate with your most common form of casual writing, and you’ll automatically become more deliberate in other mediums.

Words are tools. Expand your vocabulary to make your writing more precise. There’s no need to use a ten-dollar word when a ten-cent word will suffice, but having more tools in your toolbox will allow you to select the most appropriate tool for the job. Because sometimes you need an ax, sometimes you need a scalpel. So pick one new word each day, and then use it at least 21 times in your conversations with others that day. The most useful words will stick, and your vocabulary will expand over time.

Read the rest here.

Reblog: Should Christians Be Encouraged to Arm Themselves?

cross and gun

Article by John Piper

As chancellor of Bethlehem College & Seminary, I want to send a different message to our students, and to the readers of Desiring God, than Jerry Falwell, Jr., sent to the students of Liberty University in a campus chapel service on December 4.

For the sake of the safety of his campus, and in view of terrorist activity, President Falwell encouraged the students to get permits to carry guns. After implying that he had a gun in his back pocket, he said, “I just want to take this opportunity to encourage all of you to get your permit. We offer a free course. And let’s teach them a lesson if they ever show up here.” He clarified on December 9 that the policy at Liberty now includes permission to carry guns in the dormitories.

Falwell and I exchanged several emails, and he was gracious enough to talk to me on the phone so I could get as much clarity as possible. I want it to be clear that our disagreement is between Christian brothers who are able to express appreciation for each other’s ministries person to person.

My main concern in this article is with the appeal to students that stirs them up to have the mindset: Let’s all get guns and teach them a lesson if they come here. The concern is the forging of a disposition in Christians to use lethal force, not as policemen or soldiers, but as ordinary Christians in relation to harmful adversaries.

The issue is not primarily about when and if a Christian may ever use force in self-defense, or the defense of one’s family or friends. There are significant situational ambiguities in the answer to that question. The issue is about the whole tenor and focus and demeanor and heart-attitude of the Christian life. Does it accord with the New Testament to encourage the attitude that says, “I have the power to kill you in my pocket, so don’t mess with me”? My answer is, No.

Read the rest here.